Edible Mushrooms Video

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Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Mushroom black market

Several mushroom species are cultivated or collected for use in a recreational or ritualistic context. These mushrooms all have hallucinogenic properties and for this reason they are typically not considered edible. Whereas edible mushrooms are commonly defined by their comestibility and hallucinogenic mushrooms are not comestibles, they are nevertheless eaten and when taken in appropriate doses, the mycotoxins present in the mushrooms will be metabolized by the eater and their effects will disappear within several hours.

Agrocybe farinacea - collected in Japan. Contains psilocybin.
Amanita muscaria - Commonly used for shamanistic purposes by the peoples of Siberia, Turkic peoples, the Sami people, and others. Contains ibotenic acid, muscarine, muscimol.
Conocybe spp. - Used for shamanic purposes by the Mazatecs of Oaxaca. [7] Contains psilocin and psilocybin.
Copelandia spp. - Commonly growing in Hawaii. Contains psilocin and psilocybin
Galerina steglichii - Rare and rarely collected. Contains psilocybin, alpha-amanitin and other amatoxins.
Gerronema fibula- A tropical mushroom.
Gerronema solidipes - A tropical mushroom.
Gymnopilus spp. - Commonly bitter in taste, recreational use is uncommon with most species. Contains psilocybin, bis-noryangonin, and hispidine.
Hypholoma spp. - Contains psilocybin.
Inocybe spp. - Contains muscarine, psilocybin, and aeruginascine.
Mycena cyanorrhiza - Contains psilocybin.
Panaeolus spp. - Collected and cultivated for recreational use.Contains psilocybin, psilocin, serotonin, urea, and tryptophan.
Pluteus spp. - Contains psilocybin [10]
Psilocybe spp. - cultivated for its hallucinogenic properties. These species contain the mycotoxins: psilocybin, psilocin, baeocystin, norbaeocystin, and occasionally other psychoactive tryptamines.

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